New Board Member and President Announced

Dear SNAP Colleagues,

 

We are delighted to announce that Patricia Grieve, a senior scholar of literary and cultural studies at Columbia, has accepted to join the SNAP Board for a three-year appointment (2018-2021) and that Andrew Devereux, a founding board member of SNAP, has accepted to become the organization’s president, also for a three-year term (2018-2021).

 

Andrew Devereux, who will be joining the History Department at the University of California, San Diego this fall, has taught medieval and early modern history at Loyola Marymount University since 2012. He most recently edited a special issue for Republics of Letters (2018) entitled Empire and Exceptionalism: The Requerimiento and Claims of Sovereignty in the Early Modern Mediterranean and Atlantic. His book on the Mediterranean context of Spanish imperial ideology is forthcoming with Cornell University Press. Andrew is one of the founding members of SNAP and now longest-serving member of the board. His rare combination of insight, positivity, patience, and enthusiasm should prove extremely valuable to SNAP as it progresses into new waters.

 

Patricia Grieve is Nancy and Jeffrey Marcus Professor in the Humanities at Columbia University. In the Department of Latin American and Iberian Cultures, she teaches medieval Iberian and comparative literature and several courses that engage the Mediterranean. Over the past twenty years, her research has tackled multidisciplinary relationships between Spain, England, North Africa, and the Ottoman Empire. Her publications include Death and Desire in the Spanish Sentimental Romance, 1440-1550, Floire and Blancheflor and the European Romance, and The Eve of Spain: Myths of Origins in the History of Christian, Muslim, and Jewish Conflict. Her current book project, Flores y Blancaflor and the Medieval and Early Modern Mediterranean, delves deeper into the comparative and cross-cultural context. She brings extensive expertise in leading and planning initiatives that bridge disciplines and institutions. Her passion for leading creative cooperative projects aligns closely with SNAP’s mission and promises exciting new directions for the organization.

 

The nominating committee received a number of applications from talented and extremely accomplished individuals in the field, an indication of the profile which the organization has achieved and the broad interest in the kind of scholarship and cooperation SNAP encourages. It is not easy for the committee or board to limit their choice to one individual in this process. We are very grateful for the interest shown and are confident we can expand our activities to harness some of this enthusiasm and energy.

 

I would like to thank the nominating committee, Barbara Fuchs, Maribel Fierro, and Mayte Green-Mercado for their service to SNAP.

 

On behalf of the SNAP Board,

 

Camilo

Andalusi Musical Traditions and Maghrib Workshop Program

The Maghrib Workshop

                  The Spain-North Africa Project

                                               March 3-4, 2017 UC Santa Cruz, Humanities 1, Room 210

 

Law and Movement: Historical Roots and Contexts,
Contemporary Questions, Part 2 (The Maghrib Workshop)

Friday March 3

Morning

8:30 am Transportation from the Dream Inn to Humanities 1 by carpool

9:00 Coffee and Introduction

9:30 Camilo Gómez-Rivas, Literature, University of California, Santa Cruz, “Refugees of the Reconquista and the Ransoming of Captives”

11:00 Marc Andre, Laboratoire de Recherche Historique Rhône-Alpes, “Militarizing the Metropolis? The Army during the Algerian War in France through the Fortress Montluc”

12:30 Lunch (Humanities 2, Room 259)

Afternoon

1:30 Lia Brozgal, French and Francophone Studies, University of California, Los Angeles, “‘Heureux les kabyles blonds’: Reading Race in the October 17 Archive”

3:00 Break

3:15 Alma Heckman, History and Jewish Studies, UCSC, “The Rights and Obligations of Divorce: Jews and Moroccan Independence”

4:45 Concluding Remarks

6:00 Dinner (Stevenson Fireside Lounge)

 

 

Andalusī Musical Traditions of the Western Mediterranean
(The Spain-North Africa Project)

Saturday, March 4

Morning

8:30 am Transportation from the Dream Inn to Humanities 1 by carpool

9:00 Coffee and Introduction

9:30 Rachel Colwell, Music, University of California, Berkeley, “al-Jaww al-Malouf al-Tounsi, an Acoustemology of Listening”

10:30 Jonathan Glasser, Anthropology, College of William and Mary, “The Problem of Muslim-Jewish Musical Borderlands at Algeria’s Spanish-Ottoman Frontier”

12:00 Lunch (Humanities 1, Room 202)

Afternoon

1:00 Chris Silver, History, University of California, Los Angeles, “Marching (and Waltzing) toward Independence: North African Jewish Musicians at Mid-Century”

2:30 Break

2:45 Dwight Reynolds, Religious Studies, University of California, Santa Barbara, “Al-Andalus in the Musical World of the Medieval Mediterranean”

4:15 Brain-Storming Session on Follow-up

5:00 End!

Contact: Camilo Gómez-Rivas

cgomezri@ucsc.edu 

Funded by a University of California Humanities Research Institute
Faculty Working Group grant and by the Institute for Humanities Research
University of California, Santa Cruz

Andalusi Musical Traditions and Maghrib Studies Workshop

Andalusi Musical Traditions and Maghrib Studies Workshop
March 3-4 UC Santa Cruz

We are thrilled to tell you about a two-day event we are organizing, bringing together the Maghrib Workshop and the Spain-North Africa Project, and taking place on March 3-4, 2017, 9am-5pm, Humanities 1, Rm. 210, UC Santa Cruz.

 

The details are:


 

March 3:     “Law and Movement: Historical Roots and Contexts, Contemporary Questions”            (The Maghrib Workshop)

 

        Alma Heckman, History and Jewish Studies, UCSC

        Lia Brozgal, French and Francophone Studies, UCLA

        Marc Andre, Laboratoire de Recherche Historique Rhône-Alpes

        Camilo Gómez-Rivas, Literature, UCSC


 

March 4:     “Andalusi Musical Traditions of the Western Mediterranean”     

        (The Spain-North Africa Project)

 

        Dwight Reynolds, Religious Studies, UCSB

        Jonathan Glasser, Anthropology, William and Mary

        Rachel Colwell, Music, UCB

        Chris Silver, History, UCLA



 

For those wishing to attend, please contact Camilo Gómez-Rivas (cgomezri@ucsc.edu) to register and receive the readings (which will be circulated ten days before the meeting).

 

The Maghrib Workshop is UCHRI-funded faculty working group and an incipient West Coast network for Maghrib Studies.

 

The Spain-North Africa Project workshop on Andalusi Musical Traditions is funded by UCSC Institute for Humanities Research.



* This two-day workshop was originally scheduled for April 7-8, 2017, but scheduling conflicts prompted us to move the event up. Apologies for the inconvenience. We look forward to seeing you in Santa Cruz!

Art and Ideology in the Twelfth-Century Western Mediterranean (Program)

Friday, October 14, 2016               9:00 am – 5:30 pm               38 West 86th Street, Lecture Hall 
RSVP: 212.501.3019, academicevents@bgc.bard.edu

Sponsored by the Trehan Research Fund for Islamic Art and Material Culture
in conjunction with the Spain-North Africa Project. 

In the twelfth century, new powers emerged throughout the Western Mediterranean, from the Almohads of North Africa to the Norman Kingdom of Sicily. In the Iberian Peninsula, upstart rulers with broad ambitions emerged in both Muslim and Christian territories. New city-states appeared with the dissolution of the Almoravid Empire in al-Andalus, and older kingdoms, including Castile-Leon and Aragon, began massive expansions under rulers who claimed imperial titles. This symposium explores how the rulers of this region deployed art (conceived in the broadest sense) to legitimate new claims, how they asserted their authority through the construction of palatial and liturgical spaces, and what kinds of objects their kingdoms produced, traded, or coveted. Talks will investigate how these rulers looked to imperial and caliphal precedents and rivals for models, how they elaborated on these models, and which communities of artisans and workmen they drew from. By bringing together scholars who work on the component kingdoms of this region, this symposium seeks to clarify the connections among them, crossing the geographic, ethnic, and religious lines imposed by modern scholarship. In doing so, it aims to develop new models for understanding the imbricated world of the medieval Western Mediterranean.

9 am
Peter N. Miller
Dean and Professor, Bard Graduate Center
Welcome

Abigail Krasner Balbale
Assistant Professor, Bard Graduate Center
Introduction

Camilo Gómez-Rivas
Assistant Professor of Mediterranean Studies, University of California, Santa Cruz; President, Spain-North Africa Project
Introduction

9:15 am
Lev Arie Kapitaikin
Faculty Lecturer, Islamic Art, Tel Aviv University
“Evoking Tales in a Medieval Ceiling: Sulayman’s / Solomon’s Birds in the Capella Palatina of Palermo”

10 am
Juan Carlos Ruiz Souza
Professor of Art History, Complutense University of Madrid
“Al-Andalus and Castile in Front of Hispania: Art and Its Protagonists in the Construction of a Shared Identity”

10:45 am
Coffee Break

11:15 am
María Judith Feliciano
Independent Scholar
“Twelfth-Century Textiles in Iberia at the Crossroads of Commerce and Ritual”

12 pm
Lunch Break

1 pm
Francisco Prado-Vilar
Director of Cultural and Artistic Projects, Harvard University, Real Colegio Complutense
Laudes Regiae: Kingship, Transfiguration, and Eschatology in the Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela”

1:45 pm
Response and Q&A

Abigail Krasner Balbale
Assistant Professor, Bard Graduate Center
Respondent

2:30 pm
Coffee Break

3 pm
Graduate Student Papers and Panel

Linda G. Jones
Ramón y Cajal Research Professor, Pompeu Fabra University, Barcelona
Chair

Umberto Bongianino
Doctoral Candidate, Islamic Art and Archaeology, University of Oxford, Khalili Research Center
“The Ideological Power of Some Almohad Illuminated Manuscripts”

Negar Rokhgar
Doctoral Student, Art History, Rutgers University
“Squinches, Signifiers of Muslim-Norman Integration at the Church of S. Cataldo in Palermo”

Heather Hoge
Doctoral Candidate, History of Art and Architecture, The Pennsylvania State University
“The Towers of Cefalù: A Display of Power in Roger II’s New Kingdom”

4:30 pm
Concluding Discussion

5 pm
Reception

RSVP is required. Please click on the registration link below, email academicevents@bgc.bard.edu, or call 212.501.3019.

Register: https://www.bgc.bard.edu/news/events/art-and-ideology/register.html#register-form

Go to the BGC page: http://www.bgc.bard.edu/news/events/art-and-ideology.html

Art and Ideology Symposium at Bard Graduate Center

Art and Ideology in the Twelfth-Century Western Mediterranean

a Symposium at Bard Graduate Center, New York City, October 14, 2016

Supported by the Trehan Fund for Islamic Art and Material Culture

co-sponsored by the Spain-North Africa Project

 

Call for Papers

 

In the twelfth century, new powers emerged throughout the Western Mediterranean, from the Almohads of North Africa to the Norman Kingdom of Sicily. In the Iberian Peninsula, upstart rulers with broad ambitions emerged in both Muslim and Christian territories. New city-states (ṭā’ifa pl. ṭawā’if) appeared with the dissolution of the Almoravid Empire in al-Andalus, and older kingdoms, including Castile-León and Aragon, began massive expansions under rulers who claimed imperial titles. “Art and Ideology in the Twelfth-Century Mediterranean” explores how the rulers of this region deployed art (conceived in the broadest sense) to legitimate new claims, how they asserted their authority through the construction of palatial and liturgical spaces, and what kinds of objects their kingdoms produced, traded, or coveted. We will investigate how these rulers looked to imperial and caliphal precedents and rivals for models, how they elaborated on these models, and which communities of artisans and workmen they drew on.

 

The aim of the symposium is to consider art and ideology in the Western Mediterranean as an integrated region where culture and religio-political ideologies cut across the geographic, ethnic, and religious lines that are so often used to divide it. Art and material culture provide a powerful lens for considering and clarifying the sometimes-hidden connections in this region, since the movement of objects and craftsmen rarely ceased at the edges of the cultural zones and traditions later fostered and imposed by nation-state institutions and modern scholars. We will explore how examining the broader region affects our understanding of its component kingdoms, and, following recent scholarship, seek to establish a theoretical framework for understanding the imbricated world of the medieval Western Mediterranean.

 

The symposium will feature several keynote lectures by scholars who work on Sicily, North Africa, and the Iberian Peninsula from Christian and Islamic perspectives, followed by a panel of shorter papers by junior scholars. We welcome proposals of 20-minute papers for this panel from PhD students and those within three years of the PhD, considering these topics from any disciplinary perspective.

 

Potential topics for presentation include (but are not limited to) questions such as the following:

 

  • How were art and architecture deployed by rulers and aspiring rulers and their courts?

  • How are articulations of politico-religious power visible in architectural construction and decoration?

  • What artisanal communities participated in the production of new spaces and what was the nature of their relationship to political power and patronage?

  • How were legitimating strategies mirrored across cultural and political boundaries and how is this visible in material culture and its circulation?

  • How were old patterns adopted and transformed by those engaged in new political endeavors and projects?

  • How did groups not clearly associated with the dominant religious identities and evolving orthodoxies  (e.g. Jews, Mozarabs, and Kharijites) participate, and how was their cultural production affected by the political and demographic transformations of the twelfth century?

  • How did people who were traditionally marginalized, including slaves and women, participate in programs of cultural production?

  • How were new ideas of crusading/jihad manifested in material culture?

 

Please submit your 300-word proposals via email to abigail.balbale@bgc.bard.edu by Friday, July 29.

Final drafts for pre-circulation are due October 1.

Spring Letter

Dear SNAP colleagues,

 

Happy late spring/early summer (or otherwise, depending on where you are). SNAP’s executive board has met several times during the last six months to discuss future directions and projects. We’ll be rolling out a few ideas in future weeks and months, but we wanted to write you now with news of upcoming events and changes so you can check your calendars.

 

We’re thrilled to inform you that SNAP will hold a symposium with the title, “Art and Ideology in the Twelfth-Century Western Mediterranean” on October 14, 2016 at Bard Graduate Center in New York. A call-for-papers as well as further information on the symposium is forthcoming in the next few weeks.

 

Our second piece of news is that SNAP is building a new website. The new site is at the following url: http://www.spainnorthafricaproject.org/. The platform we used to build the former site is no longer being developed, so we’ve changed the design. We have built the new site minimally and will be adding material and functions gradually. The older site will be replaced with a new SNAP project, about which we’ll tell you more in future months. The new site is actively being worked on. If you have any questions or changes you want made (e.g., to your info on the roster) contact me at: cgomezri@ucsc.edu

 

And, lastly, we also wanted to alert you to a second SNAP event (which is still tentative, pending funding, centered around sensory perception in Iberia and the Maghrib with a particular focus on the study of musical practices and culinary culture), planned for the spring, April 7-8 2017, at UCSC and to be held in conjunction with a meeting of the Maghrib Workshop (a UCHRI multi-campus working group). More on that later.

 

We look forward to seeing and hearing from you.

 

Best wishes,

Camilo



 

The Aghlabids and Their Neighbors

The Aghlabids & Their Neighbors: Art & Material Culture in Ninth-Century North Africa

Interdisciplinary Workshop

May 23-24 2014

UNC-Chapel Hill Winston House,

3 Bedford Square, London WC1B 3RA

This two-day workshop, to be held at the UNC-Chapel Hill European Studies Center in London, takes as its focus the history and material culture of the Aghlabid dynasty of Ifrīqiya and their immediate neighbors in the region. We envision the workshop as an opportunity for mutually-interested colleagues to begin a conversation about North Africa in the ninth century, to consider the region not as a peripheral frontier whose artistic production was inferior to or derivative of trends in the ‘Abbasid heartlands of Iraq and Egypt, but as one of the vibrant centers of the early medieval Dar al-Islam.

The workshop will be structured around informal, brief (ten to fifteen-minute) presentations focused on any aspect of the art, architecture, archaeology, and material culture; urbanism, landscape, economic, numismatic and social history; or to present overviews of relevant museum collections and archives. We particularly welcome participants from the North African countries on which the workshop focuses, and the organizers aim to provide financial assistance to those participants. The workshop’s official languages will be English and French.

We hope not only to re-evaluate notions of the region’s peripherality in Islamic art history, but to illuminate processes of acculturation and exchange between ninth-century North Africa, Iberia, Sicily/Italy, and other regions. Collegial discussion, facilitated by a moderator, will follow each group of presentations.  It is hoped that the workshop will spark an initial conversation and spur an ongoing interdisciplinary dialogue on this crucial dynasty and period.

Abstracts of 250-300 words in English or French should be sent to Mariam Rosser-Owen (m.rosserowen@vam.ac.uk) and Glaire Anderson (glaire@email.unc.edu) by 15 September 2013.

Les Aghlabides et leurs voisins:

Art et la culture matérielle en Afrique du Nord au IXe siècle

23-24 mai 2014

UNC-Chapel Hill Winston House,

3 Bedford Square, London WC1B 3RA

L’objectif du colloque est l’analyse de l’histoire et de la culture matérielle de la dynastie aghlabide de l’Ifriqiya et des leurs voisins dans la région. Nous envisageons le colloque comme une occasion pour commencer une conversation à propos de l’Afrique du Nord au IXe siècle qui présente la région non comme une frontière périphérique dont la production artistique était inférieur ou dérivé de tendances dans les bastions abbaside de l’Iraq et l’Egypte, mais comme l’un des centres dynamiques de la Dar al-Islam au haut Moyen Âge.

Le colloque sera structuré autour des présentations informelles de courte durée (dix à quinze minutes). L’accent sera mis sur tout aspect de l’art, l’architecture, histoire économique, sociale et numismatique, ou des collections des musées et des archives. Nous invitons tout particulièrement la participation des collègues des pays de l’Afrique du Nord. Les organisateurs visent à offrir les frais des voyages à ces participants. Les langues officielles de la conférence sont l’anglais et le français.

Nous espérons de réévaluer la notion de périphéricité de la région dans l’histoire de l’art islamique, et éclairer les processus d’acculturation et d’échanges entre l’Afrique du Nord, la péninsule ibérique, Sicile/Italie, et d’autres régions dans le neuvième siècle. Discussion collégiale, facilitée par un modérateur, suivra chaque groupe de présentations. Il est à espérer que le colloque va stimuler un dialogue interdisciplinaire sur cette dynastie et période cruciales.

Les résumés de 250-300 mots en anglais ou français doivent être envoyées à Mariam Rosser-Owen (m.rosserowen@vam.ac.uk) et Glaire Anderson (glaire@email.unc.edu) par 15 Septembre 2013.

LMU Conference Program

 

DAY 1: POWER RELATIONS &RELIGIOUS COMMUNITIES IN THE WESTERN MEDITERRANEAN

William Hannon library, 3rd Floor
Von der Ahe Family suite

9:00-09:30    REGISTRATION

        Registration on site: $15 for public, $10 for students, free for members of LMU community

        We encourage pre-registration at the following link: http://bit.ly/1isAGME
Parking available in University Hall Garage, off Lincoln Blvd.

9:30-09:50    OPENING REMARKS

        Andrew Devereux (Loyola Marymount University)

        Michael O’Sullivan (Dean BCLA, Loyola Marymount University)

        Sharon Kinoshita and Brian Catlos (Co-Directors the Mediterranean Seminar/UC MRP)

        Yuen-Gen Liang (President, Spain-North Africa Project)

9:50-11:50 WORKSHOP: Consolidation of Identity on the Margins in North Africa

        Moderator: Paul Sidelko (Metropolitan State University of Denver)

        Mohamad Ballan (University of Chicago), “‘They shall come to you from the West with

        God’s religion’: Ibāḍī Doctrine and Berber Identity in Ibn Sallām’s Kitāb (ca. 875)”

    Commentator: Paul Love (University of Michigan)

Manuela Ceballos (Emory University), “Power and Vulnerability in the Biography of

        a Sixteenth Century Moroccan Saint”

    Commentator: Emily Gottreich (University of California, Berkeley)

11:50-13:00    LUNCH

13:00-15:15    PANEL: Expressions of Power

 

Chair: Najwa al-Qattan (Loyola Marymount University)

        Discussants: Abigail Krasner Balbale (Bard Graduate Center)

           Camilo Gómez-Rivas (The American University in Cairo)

    Yoshihiko Ito (Tokai University), “New Power, Old Territory, and

        Renewed Architecture in the 10th-Century Kingdom of León”

    Thomas Devaney (University of Rochester), “From Tension to Violence:

        Inciting a Riot in Fifteenth-Century Castile”

    Marya T. Green-Mercado (University of Michigan), “Prophecy as Diplomacy:

        Morisco Prophecies of Henry IV of France”

    Sasha Pack (University at Buffalo), “Francisco Merry y Colom and

        the Ambivalent Spanish Encounter with Moroccan Jewry, 1860-1864”

15:15-15:30    COFFEE BREAK

15:30-18:00    TALKING ARTIFACTS: Geographies of Power

Chair: Yuen-Gen Liang (Wheaton College MA and National Taiwan University)

        Discussant: Audience

    Josie Hendrickson (University of Alberta), “Power and Pilgrimage:

        al-Burzulī (d. 1438) on Sailing with Christians”

    Karen Pinto (Gettysburg College), “Islamic Maps as Maghrib/Mediterranean Artifacts”

    Gil Klein (Loyola Marymount University), “Subverting Cities: Roman Land

        and Rabbinic Assumption of Imperial Power in the Eastern Mediterranean”

18:00-19:30    RECEPTION: The Marymount Institute, University Hall, Room 3002

The SNAP conference is made possible by the generous support of Loyola Marymount University’s Bellarmine College of Liberal Arts, the Office of the Provost, the Department of History, the Peace Studies Program, Dr. Lawrence A. Tritle (Dept. of History), the Marymount Institute for Faith, Culture, and the Arts, and the Association for Spanish and Portuguese Historical Studies

DAY 2: MEDITERRANEAN CONNECTIVITES

This workshop will consist of discussion of three pre-circulated papers and a presentation by featured scholar, Adam Sabra (History, University of California-Santa Barbara)

Location: Marymount Institute, University Hall, Room 3002

More information and call for papers at
http://humweb.ucsc.edu/mediterraneanseminar/ 

SNAP Conference at LMU

The Spain-North Africa Project and the Mediterranean Seminar University of California Multi-Campus Research Project are pleased to announce a two-day, two-part event, to take place in May, 2014, at Loyola Marymount University-Los Angeles.  This forum will provide opportunities for intellectual exchange among scholars of the Mediterranean who work in a variety of disciplines and time periods.

Friday, May 2, 2014: The Spain-North Africa Project (SNAP), with the generous support of a Loyola Marymount University Bellarmine College of Liberal Arts Conference Grant, will present a one-day conference, Power Relations and Religious Communities in the Western Mediterranean.

Saturday, May 3, 2014:  The UC Mediterranean Studies MRP Spring Workshop, “Mediterranean Connectivities,” which will feature three pre-circulated papers, and a featured scholar (TBA).

CFP: Power Relations and Religious Communities in the Western Mediterranean (Friday, May 2, 2014)

The Spain-North Africa Project invites proposals for presentations at the organization’s second conference, Power Relations and Religious Communities in the Western Mediterranean.  This event approaches the topic of religious pluralism by examining the intersection of power dynamics and confessional identity.  Papers will investigate how such dynamics shaped relations among Christians, Muslims, and Jews in the Iberian Peninsula and North Africa from the medieval period to the modern day.

Power among members of the Abrahamic faiths could be manifest in a variety of ways and on numerous registers.  It could be instant, quotidian, and systemic; it could be ephemeral or institutionalized.  Power differentials between religious communities and their strictures defined an individual’s possibilities as a person.  These included aspects as elemental as who one could marry, how one inherited, what legal recourse one had access to, and what kind of violence one could be subjected to.  Power created relations and also disturbed and undermined them.  Power could attempt to enforce, but it also provoked reactions in the form of negotiation, resistance, and refusal.  Power therefore looks different from different perspectives, and it is critical that we study it embodied in individual human beings as well as collectives.  The role of power, then, is nuanced beyond the binaries of master and subject, believer and infidel; it surprises in how it affects the nature of relations within and across religious, ethnic, and political communities.  Ultimately, our goal is to understand how power dynamics shaped, formed, and structured relations and identities in a process more complex than the cooperative versus conflictive, or tolerant versus intolerant – models so dominant in recent scholarship.

The SNAP conference will include a variety of formats for the presentation of work.  A traditional Panel will provide the opportunity to present polished papers.  A Workshop will enable presenters to pre-circulate papers and receive constructive feedback at the forum.  Finally, the conference will include an innovative “Artifacts” session in which presenters each pre-circulate a single artifact – perhaps one that presents a puzzle – that will encourage discussion, exploration, and engagement.  Examples of artifacts include a short portion of a text, musical piece, or film clip; or an image of art, architecture, or object.  Presenters will open by presenting the artifacts and the audience will weigh in with questions and proposed “readings”/interpretations of the artifacts.  All papers and artifacts must be tied to the theme of the conference.  Through this variety of sessions, we encourage the dynamic exchange and exploration of ideas in ways that bring together scholars from the various disciplines, geographies, and time periods in which SNAP’s members work.

Please email proposals to Andrew Devereux (awdevereux@gmail.com /andrew.devereux@lmu.edu) no later than December 15, 2013.  Proposals should be no more than 300 words and they should identify (in order of priority) one or more types of session in which you would like to present.

The SNAP Executive Board is exploring the possibility of a third SNAP publication coming out of this event.

CFP: Mediterranean Connectivities (Saturday, May 3, 2014)

A Call for Presenters for the Spring 2014 Workshop of the Mediterranean Seminar/UCMRP will be sent out on 16 December, 2013. The theme of the workshop will be “Mediterranean Connectivities” We will welcome proposals for presentations on works-in-progress in any relevant discipline which examine historical dynamics is any subregion of the Mediterranean. We are especially interested in papers on the Eastern or Central Mediterranean, and papers which focus on regional and intra-regional connectivity. Graduate students may submit proposals on any topic relating to the Mediterranean.

Further information at mailbox@mediterraneanseminar.org, but please stand by for the detailed Call for Presenters.

LMU Conference Program

DAY 1: POWER RELATIONS &RELIGIOUS COMMUNITIES IN THE WESTERN MEDITERRANEAN

William Hannon library, 3rd Floor
Von der Ahe Family suite

9:00-09:30    REGISTRATION

        Registration on site: $15 for public, $10 for students, free for members of LMU community

        We encourage pre-registration at the following link: http://bit.ly/1isAGME
Parking available in University Hall Garage, off Lincoln Blvd.

9:30-09:50    OPENING REMARKS

        Andrew Devereux (Loyola Marymount University)

        Michael O’Sullivan (Dean BCLA, Loyola Marymount University)

        Sharon Kinoshita and Brian Catlos (Co-Directors the Mediterranean Seminar/UC MRP)

        Yuen-Gen Liang (President, Spain-North Africa Project)

9:50-11:50 WORKSHOP: Consolidation of Identity on the Margins in North Africa

        Moderator: Paul Sidelko (Metropolitan State University of Denver)

        Mohamad Ballan (University of Chicago), “‘They shall come to you from the West with

        God’s religion’: Ibāḍī Doctrine and Berber Identity in Ibn Sallām’s Kitāb (ca. 875)”

    Commentator: Paul Love (University of Michigan)

Manuela Ceballos (Emory University), “Power and Vulnerability in the Biography of

        a Sixteenth Century Moroccan Saint”

    Commentator: Emily Gottreich (University of California, Berkeley)

11:50-13:00    LUNCH

13:00-15:15    PANEL: Expressions of Power

 

Chair: Najwa al-Qattan (Loyola Marymount University)

        Discussants: Abigail Krasner Balbale (Bard Graduate Center)

           Camilo Gómez-Rivas (The American University in Cairo)

    Yoshihiko Ito (Tokai University), “New Power, Old Territory, and

        Renewed Architecture in the 10th-Century Kingdom of León”

    Thomas Devaney (University of Rochester), “From Tension to Violence:

        Inciting a Riot in Fifteenth-Century Castile”

    Marya T. Green-Mercado (University of Michigan), “Prophecy as Diplomacy:

        Morisco Prophecies of Henry IV of France”

    Sasha Pack (University at Buffalo), “Francisco Merry y Colom and

        the Ambivalent Spanish Encounter with Moroccan Jewry, 1860-1864”

15:15-15:30    COFFEE BREAK

15:30-18:00    TALKING ARTIFACTS: Geographies of Power

Chair: Yuen-Gen Liang (Wheaton College MA and National Taiwan University)

        Discussant: Audience

    Josie Hendrickson (University of Alberta), “Power and Pilgrimage:

        al-Burzulī (d. 1438) on Sailing with Christians”

    Karen Pinto (Gettysburg College), “Islamic Maps as Maghrib/Mediterranean Artifacts”

    Gil Klein (Loyola Marymount University), “Subverting Cities: Roman Land

        and Rabbinic Assumption of Imperial Power in the Eastern Mediterranean”

18:00-19:30    RECEPTION: The Marymount Institute, University Hall, Room 3002

The SNAP conference is made possible by the generous support of Loyola Marymount University’s Bellarmine College of Liberal Arts, the Office of the Provost, the Department of History, the Peace Studies Program, Dr. Lawrence A. Tritle (Dept. of History), the Marymount Institute for Faith, Culture, and the Arts, and the Association for Spanish and Portuguese Historical Studies

DAY 2: MEDITERRANEAN CONNECTIVITES

This workshop will consist of discussion of three pre-circulated papers and a presentation by featured scholar, Adam Sabra (History, University of California-Santa Barbara)

Location: Marymount Institute, University Hall, Room 3002

More information and call for papers at
http://humweb.ucsc.edu/mediterraneanseminar/